What is my risk?
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Does Cancer Run in Your Family? 

Genetic testing could rule out the possibility of developing hereditary cancer. Our genetic tests look for mutations in a number of genes that have been attributed to Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) Syndrome and Lynch Syndrome. By taking the Hereditary Cancer Support screening quiz, you may be able to  determine your potential for developing hereditary cancer. Though most cancers are attributed to environmental and lifestyle choices, there are several factors that contribute to your risk of developing hereditary cancers. The best way to rule out hereditary cancer is genetic testing.

Hereditary Cancer develops because of a gene mutation that has been passed down (inherited) through your family, increasing your risk for certain types of cancer. There are two most common hereditary cancer syndromes: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome and Lynch syndrome. Most cancers are not hereditary, but are due to lifestyle and environmental factors. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and avoiding known carcinogens like smoking, can reduce your chances of developing cancer.

Cancer Syndromes We Screen For

Hereditary Cancer Support currently screens for two hereditary cancer syndromes, HBOC and Lynch Syndrome.

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome is caused by mutations in one of two genes: BRCA1 or BRCA2. Women with HBOC typically have a high risk of both ovarian and breast cancer. Men with HBOC have a high risk for breast and prostate cancer. At times, these cancers can develop at a young age. These particular gene mutations are the most common cause of hereditary breast cancer. In fact, some families with BRCA1 mutations have an 80 percent1 lifetime risk of breast cancer.

BRCA1 AND BRCA2 ASSOCIATED CANCERS
BREAST OVARIAN PROSTATE COLON ENDOMETRIAL MELANOMA OTHER

Lynch Syndrome

Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by mutations in one of five genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Lynch Syndrome is also known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC). People with LS have a higher risk of developing several different types of cancer. The highest risks are for colorectal cancer in both women and men and for endometrial cancer in women. Some people with Lynch Syndrome may be diagnosed with cancer two or more times in their lifetime.

MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, AND EPCAM ASSOCIATED CANCERS
BREAST OVARIAN PROSTATE COLON ENDOMETRIAL MELANOMA OTHER