What we test for
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Genetic Testing

A genetic test requires a sample of your DNA, which is present in the cells that make up your body. A hereditary cancer specialist will select the genetic test that makes the most sense for you based on your personal and/or family history of cancer. A small amount of your blood or a saliva sample will be sent to a lab for analysis. Once a sample is received at the lab, your DNA can be isolated and examined for mutations within genes selected for testing. Your test results will indicate your inherited risk of developing cancer.

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

BRCA1 AND BRCA2 ASSOCIATED CANCERS
BREAST OVARIAN PROSTATE COLON ENDOMETRIAL MELANOMA OTHER
Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome is caused by mutations in one of two genes: BRCA1 or BRCA2. Women with HBOC typically have a high risk of both ovarian and breast cancer. Men with HBOC have a high risk for breast and prostate cancer. At times, these cancers can develop at a young age. These particular gene mutations are the most common cause of hereditary breast cancer. In fact, some families with BRCA1 mutations have an 80 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.1

Lynch Syndrome

MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, AND EPCAM ASSOCIATED CANCERS
BREAST OVARIAN PROSTATE COLON ENDOMETRIAL MELANOMA OTHER

Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by mutations in one of five genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Lynch Syndrome is also sometimes known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC). People with LS have a higher risk of developing several different types of cancer. The highest risks are for colorectal cancer in men and for endometrial cancer in women. Some people with Lynch Syndrome may be diagnosed with cancer two or more times in their lifetime.

  1. http://www.facingourrisk.org/understanding-brca-and-hboc/information/hereditary-cancer/hereditary-genetics/basics/hereditary-vs-sporadic-cancer.php